Crafting national development plan for long-term stability

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By: Dalmar Hassan Kanyare

Key objectives of the National Development Plan include; articulating national development priorities; setting out a clear vision for Somalia’s security, social and economic development priorities as well as defining the key state building and peace building priorities of the nation as clearly as possible.

The new deal for Somalia is slated to end on August 2016, after three years some steps have been taken towards building the capacity of the Federal and state governments of Somalia to deliver services to the populace of a post conflict nation, traumatized by 25 years of war of all against all, that is still faced by an insurgency that while winding down, is active through much of the country.

Having made the obligatory nod towards the achievements of the new deal, it is obvious to anyone, however peripherally involved in the process that the new deal is winding down in an environment of deep disappointment amongst the citizens of Somalia in this process that promised so much and delivered in many instances so little.

Inevitably many Somalis have woken up to the reality that only a home grown National Development  Plan, consultative in nature that takes into account the new federal dispensation of the country, focusing on addressing and solving the long term structural needs of a society and economy with the potential and resources to be a driving force in the East African region,  Is the only solution to moving on from the crisis driven “humanitarian aid complex” stranglehold of the economy, and the learned helplessness of a population that is more than 70% youth, so despondent of a life in their motherland, that a more than better chance of drowning in the Mediterranean is to them, still, a better odds than a life of dignity and with their skills fully utilized at home.

The purpose of the National Development Plan is to provide guidance to the national authorities, international development partners and other stakeholders (private sector, civil societies and citizens at large) in Somalia in shaping a medium term strategic framework to build upon achievements of the past few years, further strengthening the (emerging) state structures, and creating a favorable environment for private and non-government sector development, and –most importantly – bring the benefits of the development efforts to the citizens of the nation.

The National Development Plan has three key interrelated objectives, articulating national development priorities, setting out a clear vision for Somalia’s security, social and economic development priorities as well as defining the key state building and peace building priorities of the nation as clearly as possible.

The plan will further clarify the overall political vision (Vision 2016, Somali Six Pillars, constitutional processes).  The underlying strategy is clear: well-functioning and efficient state structures are the pre-condition to drive forward the peace process and stabilize the country’s security.

Internationally, there are no examples of lasting peace, stability and positive development in the absence of well-functioning home grown state structures that provide a peaceful forum for political debate, guide the investments in the development arena, and provide tangible services to the citizens, in line with the expectations of the citizens.

It will also provide a structure for resource allocation and management aligning budget allocations gradually towards NDP priorities, the plan will provide an accurate macro-fiscal framework (annual budget planning process, dialogue with IFIs, Aid Flows mapping), providing up-to-date national poverty data and will incorporate existing sector strategies and policy documents as appropriate.

It will guide and provide the sole framework for Development Partner support within the defined Federl Government of Somalia priorities in the coming three years: in terms of structuring well defined funding priorities, whilst ensuring FGS leadership of the development agenda and engagement with development trust funds set up in Somalia’s name over the past few years